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Your Health

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Sanofi Ireland Ltd.

18 Riverwalk
Citywest Business Campus
Dublin 24

Tel : + 353 (0)1 403 5600

Content :

Metabolic disorders

Metabolic Disorders

Diabetes mellitus is a common condition where there is too much of the sugar called glucose in the blood, because the body is unable to convert it into energy in the normal way. This is because not enough insulin is produced by the body or the body does not respond to insulin adequately (insulin resistance).

 

There are two main types of diabetes

  • Type 1 diabetes is a condition when not enough, or no, insulin is produced by the body. Insulin injections are therefore essential. This form of diabetes develops quickly, usually over a few weeks, with very obvious symptoms of illness.

  • Type 2 diabetes is a condition that usually occurs in middle age or elderly people. It occurs when the body is unable to use its insulin properly and/or not enough insulin is produced.

Controlling Diabetes to minimise risk

Although diabetes cannot be cured, it can be controlled by effective treatment. The parameters to be monitored closely in diabetes are:

  • Fasting blood glucose (glycemia) level, which should be held as close as possible to normal (at least below 6 mmol/l);

  • Glycosylated haemoglobin or HbA1C (A1C) levels, which give an estimate of average blood glucose levels over the past two to three months. Nondiabetics naturally maintain an HbA1C level of between 4 and 6%, while diabetics attempt to keep their HbA1C level below 7% or, better, below 6.5%.

Uncontrolled diabetes carries a high risk of severe complications

A person suffering from diabetes with A1C levels that remain constantly above normal (uncontrolled diabetes) runs a high risk of developing severe complications in the short and long term: blindness, kidney failure, heart disease, stroke, impotence or lower limb amputation.

Soaring Epidemiology

Millions of people around the world suffer from diabetes and its complications. The latest World Health Organisation estimate is 177 million and WHO statistics predict that over 300 million people will be affected by 2025 [1].

In Ireland, the Diabetes Federation of Ireland estimate that 250,000 people in Ireland have the condition, but 100,000 are completely unaware of it [2].

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